On the Uselessness of Hermeneutics


So, it’s nearly six weeks into 2013 and I feel that I haven’t progressed much (if at all) in my grand project of Being-A-Better-Person.

Of course, this project flies in the face of all the Buddhist (and similarly-inclined) tracts I’ve read, which uphold the basic view that we are intrinsically perfect beings robbed of an awareness and experience of our wholeness by a near-terminal case of existential amnesia. The metaphors abound: the sun obscured by clouds, a diamond concealed by dirt. There’s nothing to improve because there’s no absence and there’s no lack.

Honestly, and I say this with no cynicism whatsoever, it doesn’t make a difference. Whether you’re intrinsically flawed and have to work hard to be better or intrinsically perfect and have to work hard to remember, it all boils down to the same thing: which is to work hard, period. Glass half empty or glass half full, you’ve still got the other half to fill and no amount of hermeneutics will ever annul the effort involved.

But okay fine. To be philosophically-inclusive, let’s grant my project the pseudonym of Remembering-That-I-Am-Already-A-Perfect-Person.

In this case, no amount of rebaptizing will ever annul the absence of results produced.

Sigh.

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5 thoughts on “On the Uselessness of Hermeneutics

  1. Erik says:

    Forgot to mention this masterpiece: “Whether you’re intrinsically flawed and have to work hard to be better or intrinsically perfect and have to work hard to remember, it all boils down to the same thing: which is to work hard, period.”

    Like

  2. Balaji says:

    Isn’t feeling the need to work hard in either case itself a part of the framework of existential amnesia, i.e., an illusion (a.k.a. maya; a.k.a. The Matrix)? Perhaps the solution is to not word hard at anything! That might itself connect one to an awareness of the whole! 🙂

    Like

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